Please provide a location to search for

Apartments for Rent in Tucson, AZ - 88 Results

Renter's Guide to Tucson

Tucson is known for its desert location, its thriving arts and cultural scene, and as the home of the University of Arizona. Tucson was also recently recognized as one of the best cities for millennials due to its low cost of living and dynamic downtown scene.

Renter's Guide to Tucson AZ

The second largest city in the state of Arizona, Tucson is similar in size to Albuquerque, New Mexico and El Paso, Texas.  

It is an easy drive from Tucson to just about anywhere in Arizona. Phoenix, the state capital, and Mesa, the third-largest city in Arizona are both only approximately two hours away.  

Hot but not humid in the summer, the average summer temperature in Tucson is 100°F. The mild winters, with temperatures averaging around 65°F make Tucson a favorite place for many to settle down.

The climate is very hot and dry year-round, and there is very little precipitation. Monsoon season runs from mid-June to early September, and rainstorms are most likely to hit in July and August.

Tucson, AZ Demographics

  • Total Population574,343
  • Female 284,944
    Male 289,400
  • Median Age33.26

Cost of Living in Tucson, AZ

Tucson has a very affordable cost of living. Bus fare for an adult is $1.50, and children under the age of 5 ride for free when accompanied by a paying adult. The Tucson SunTran is the most popular means of public transportation in the city. Yellow Cab Tucson and Discount Cab Tucson are two popular taxicab services. Commute time in Tucson is 23.8 minutes on average, which is slightly less than the United States average of 24.4 minutes.

When dining out, a meal for two at a mid-range restaurant costs about $38, and a regular cappuccino costs $3.78. Basic monthly utilities for a 915-square-foot apartment cost $141.07 in Tucson.

Tucson, AZ Average Rent

  • Tucson, AZ Average Rental Price, December, 2016$630/mo
  • Studio$459
  • 1 Bedroom$557
  • 2 Bedrooms$742

Tucson, AZ Apartment Rent Ranges

  • 20%< $500
  • 48%$501-$700
  • 23%$701-$1,000
  • 5%$1,001-$1,500
  • 2%$1,501-$2,000
  • 2%> $2,000

Tucson, AZ Rent Trends

All Rentals Studio 1 Bed 2 Beds 3 Beds
Average Rent December, 2016 $630 $459 $557 $742
Jan / 2016 $619 $450 $551 $725
Sept / 2015 $616 $443 $553 $730
May / 2015 $608 $434 $537 $721
Jan / 2015 $598 $427 $525 $709
Sept / 2014 $593 $428 $528 $707
May / 2014 $599 $435 $527 $712
Jan / 2014 $595 $437 $520 $698
Sept / 2013 $592 $425 $522 $711
May / 2013 $584 $416 $518 $693
Jan / 2013 $583 $421 $509 $697
/

Living in Tucson

This Southern Arizona city is a unique place to live, there are various pros and cons of living in Tucson. First of all, Tucson is beautiful—stunning mountain views surround the desert city. Its proximity to mountains and wide open spaces means that Tucson is also a haven for people who value outdoor activities such as running, biking, rock-climbing, and hiking.

Tucson also has a wonderful and eclectic food scene. Its proximity to fertile farmland in California and Mexico means it provides an abundance of fresh produce year-round. The Mexican food in the area is also superb.

Tucson’s ethnic composition is very diverse with a large Latin American population, and is also located in an ecologically diverse place.

The weather in Tucson has both positive and negative components. The climate is hot, dry, and sunny for nearly the entire year, which can be pleasant but also very intense and occasionally oppressive. Another con is that the crime rate in Tucson is nearly double the national average. Most crime is theft-related.

Things to do in Tucson

There is a plethora of fun things to do in Tucson. Families may enjoy taking their children to the Reid Park Zoo, the Children’s Museum of Tucson, Pima Air and Space Museum, and the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum. Couples with and without children may enjoy going to Kitt Peak National Observatory to stargaze in the evening.

There are also many opportunities for outdoor activities in the Tucson area. Saguaro National Park, Madera Canyon, the Tucson Botanical Gardens, and Tohono Chul Park are all wonderful options for activities such as walking, running, hiking, and biking.

The arts scene includes many independent galleries as well as the Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block and the University of Arizona Museum of Art. For evening entertainment, catch a classic western show at the Gaslight Theater, or go to the historic Fox Tucson Theater.

There are many annual events in Tucson, including the Arizona Renaissance Festival, Tucson Folk Festival, the Banff Mountain Film Festival, and the Tucson International Mariachi Conference.

The university of Arizona sponsors teams in nine men's and twelve women's NCAA sanctioned sports, and most of these teams go by the name Arizona Wildcats. The football team, for example, plays at the Arizona Stadium, so—depending on the season—you may find excitement in catching a game.

Economy & Employment

Tucson’s economy is based on the arts, tourism, manufacturing, and technology industries. Mining also has a presence in the Tucson area, however its influence has decreased over the past several decades. The University of Arizona, Raytheon Missile Systems, and Davis-Monthan Air Force Base are the top employers in Tucson.

Tucson, AZ Households

  • Total Number of Households226,124
  • Family 131,138
    Non-family 94,985
  • Children 67,937
    No Children 158,188
  • Average People Per Household2.56
  • Median Household Income$42,661
  • Median Household Disposable Income$28,050

Tucson, AZ Crime Rate and Statistics

National Average

Below Average 100 Above Average
Total Crime Risk
199
Assault Risk
172
Automotive Theft Risk
312
Property Crime Risk
199
Rape Risk
174
Robbery Risk
158

Education in Tucson

Tucson’s public education system, called the Tucson Unified School District (TUSD), has the second highest enrollment in Arizona. It has over 60,000 students and approximately 3,700 faculty members.

Top colleges in Tucson include the University of Arizona, Tucson College, the University of Phoenix and Northern Arizona University.

Tucson, AZ Education Statistics

  • 9%No High School
  • 13%Some HighSchool
  • 34%Some College
  • 10%Associate Degree
  • 20%Bachelor Degree
  • 14%Graduate Degree

Tips for Renting in Tucson

Most tenants living in Tucson have protection under the Arizona Residential Landlord-Tenant Act. There are several important protections that apply to tenants under this law. Tenants may withhold rent if the landlord fails to maintain a safe living environment. The landlord must give at least 30-days’ notice if raising the rental rate. Tenants may take legal action if the landlord fails to return the security deposit after the leasing period ends. If a tenant does not report a criminal record on their lease, the landlord may terminate the lease. In this scenario, the tenant has 10 days to vacate the apartment. Landlords may not restrict housing from potential tenants for discriminatory reasons.

RENTCafé is your one-stop shop for finding a great new apartment in Tucson, AZ. Easily search through a wide selection of apartments for rent in Tucson, AZ, and view detailed information about available rentals including floor plans, pricing, photos, amenities, interactive maps, and thorough property descriptions. Property owners and managers are one click away, so feel free to contact them and find out all you need to know about the apartment you’re interested in. Browse Tucson, AZ apartments with rents starting from $380 and submit your rental application today!

Find Apartments for rent near Tucson, AZ with higher average rent (above $630)

Find Apartments for rent near Tucson, AZ with lower average rent (below $630)

Tucson, AZ zip codes with higher average rent (above $630)

Tucson, AZ zip codes with lower average rent (below $630)